Alcoholics Anonymous 2018-01-28T19:05:29+00:00

Alcoholics Anonymous

What is alcoholics anonymous? Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of alcoholics that are trying to stay sober and have a desire to stop drinking.

According to their literature alcoholics anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problems and help other to recover from alcoholism.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings

Alcoholics anonymous is typically held in a live meeting format. The meetings start with an introduction of how AA works and then the meeting is typically handed over to a speaker for 15 minutes. The Alcoholics anonymous preamble is often read before meetings. The AA preamble is

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help other to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self supporting through our own contributions. AA is not allied with any sect, denomination or politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and to help other alcoholics achieve sobriety.

Alcoholics are encouraged to go around the room and introduce themselves unless it is an open meeting. In the case of it being an open meeting, then nonalcoholics can observe the meeting without admitting to be an alcoholic. When people introduce themselves in an AA meeting they typical say my name is X, I am an alcoholic. For example, if you name was Bob Smith, you would say, “Hello, My name is Bob, I am an alcoholic.”

The meeting ends with the alcoholics anonymous prayer also known as the serenity prayer.

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things that I cannot change and the courage to change the things I can.

Meetings occur at what are known as AA groups. Each group operates independently, and only interacts with alcoholics anonymous intergroup for communication purposes.

There is no one type of meeting though. There are many different types of meetings. There can be a speaker meeting, a meeting where people just share, a meeting that is a workshop and a meeting where you learn about a specific step out of the twelve steps.

Another common theme of alcoholics anonymous and many other 12 step programs is working with others. This commonly means working with a sponsor. A sponsor is someone that can mentor you to help you stay sober. Typically, this person will take you through the 12 steps themselves. This person is supposed to have a year sober and is supposed to have gone through the 12 steps themselves. It is not a requirement of AA to go through the steps or to have a sponsor though.

You can find an AA meeting by calling an alcoholics anonymous phone number. The alcoholics anonymous phone number can usually be found by contacting your local AA intergroup.

AA celebrations & Alcoholics Anonymous Chips

At aa meetings its important to celebrate time in sobriety. Time in sobriety is celebrated with AA chips. Alcoholics Anonymous chips are provided for a number of different celebrations. There are one day sobriety chips, 30 day AA chips, 90 day AA chips, 1 year AA chips, 2 year Alcoholics anonymous chips. Then chips are handed out for each additional year of sobriety.

AA facts and statistics

AA groups in the U.S. – 61,258

Alcoholics Anonymous members in the United states – 1,276,165

Groups in Canada – 5,078

Members in Canada – 86,237

Groups outside of the U.S. – 50,555

Members outside of the US – 705,850

Total AA members 2,103,184

Total AA groups – 118,305

AA structure

The are two operating bodies of alcoholics anonymous. Those operating bodies are

  1. AA worldwide services – This keeps in touch with local AA groups and helps these groups get literature. They also administer the website aa.org. There are about 85 workers in the General Service Office in New York City.
  2. AA grapevine, Inc – this body publishes aa grapevine which is the fellowships monthly international journal.

These 2 operating bodies are responsible to the board of trustees, General Service Board of A.A. 7 members of the General Service Board are nonalcoholics and 14 are AA members.

Alcoholics anonymous approved literature

There are two books that are alcoholics anonymous approved literature are

The book alcoholics anonymous. This book is also known as the big book of alcoholics anonymous or the alcoholics anonymous blue book.

The other approved literature for alcoholics anonymous is the twelve steps and twelve traditions. Twelve Steps and twelve traditions is what it sounds like. The book has the 12 steps of AA and the 12 traditions of alcoholics anonymous. Each step has a specific history behind it, and that is what this book discusses. You will also likely use this book if you go to a step meeting.

These two books are the two books that every AA member should get upon going into a meeting. They are not free unless you specifically ask for them to be free.

Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous

The big book of alcoholics anonymous is 576 pages on amazon it was last published in February of 2002. It was first published in 1939

You can get the big book online for free in the itunes store, google play store or at https://www.aa.org/pages/en_US/alcoholics-anonymous

AA big book 2nd edition – published in 1955 achieved a circulation of 1,150,500

Aa big book 3rd edition – published in 1976 achieved a circulation of 19,550,000

Aa big book 4th edition

The chapters of the alcoholics anonymous big book are

  1. Bill’s Story – (pp. 1-16)
  2. There is a Solution – (pp. 17-29)
  3. More About Alcoholism – (pp. 30-43)
  4. We Agnostics – (pp. 44-57)
  5. How It Works – (pp. 58-71)
  6. Into Action – (pp. 72-88)
  7. Working With Others – (pp. 89-103)
  8. To Wives – (pp. 104-121)
  9. The Family Afterward – (pp. 122-135)
  10. To Employers – (pp. 136-150)
  11. A Vision For You – (pp. 151-164)

After the chapters of AA there are stories of alcoholics

Alcoholics Anonymous Personal stories

This part of the book discusses some alcoholism success stories.

Alcoholics anonymous 12 steps

The aa 12 steps are

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable
  2. Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this

So those are the 12 steps to AA.

AA Twelve Traditions

The twelve traditions are

  1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity.
  2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
  3. The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.
  4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole.
  5. Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.
  6. An A.A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the A.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.
  7. Every A.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
  8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
  9. A.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.
  10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.
  11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
  12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

Alcoholics anonymous 12 steps

The aa 12 steps are

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable
  2. Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this

So those are the 12 steps to AA.

AA Twelve Traditions

The twelve traditions are

  1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity.
  2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
  3. The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.
  4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole.
  5. Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.
  6. An A.A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the A.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.
  7. Every A.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
  8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
  9. A.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.
  10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.
  11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
  12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

Other AA literature

Alcoholics anonymous pamphlets

Some of the more popular AA pamphlets are

  • A brief guide to alcoholics anonymous
  • AA at a glance
  • How it works
  • Alcoholics anonymous daily reflections

The daily reflections book for alcoholics anonymous is a good book that is recommended for alcoholics as it provides guidance 365 days a year for AA members.

Who started AA

AA started around 1935 in Akron, Ohio. The founders of AA are Bill W and Dr Bob S. Dr Bob S was a surgeon in Akron Ohio. Both of them were alcoholics.

In 1939 the fellowship of alcoholics anonymous published the big book of alcoholics anonymous.

The history of Alcoholics anonymous

AA was founded in 1935 in Akron Ohio. AA first consisted of a group of about 3 people. In the fall of 1935, a second group of alcoholics anonymous was founded in New York

Then a 3rd meeting of AA was founded in Cleveland in 1939. It took 4 years to produce 100 sober alcoholics between these 3 groups.

AA slogans and sayings

Alcoholics anonymous has many aa slogans and quotes that you will hear frequently in AA meetings.

  • One day at a time
  • Easy does it
  • Live and let live
  • Stick with winners
  • But for the grace of god
  • Let go and let god
  • HALT – hungry, angry, lonely tired
  • This too shall pass